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Life Sciences Week

Cores Open Houses & Workshops

Core Open Houses & Workshops: CANCELLED for Spring 2020

This year, selected Cores will hold open houses to allow researchers to visit the Cores and see the available instrumentation.  Additionally, the MU Animal Modeling Core will sponsor hands-on workshops for faculty, staff and students. Registration for workshops is required and space is limited.

Register Online for Core Workshops

Gehrke Proteomics Center Open House

Monday, April 13, 2020. 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Bond Life Science Center, Room 212.

Registration is Free: Registration is not limited.

The MU Proteomics Center is named for Charles W. Gehrke, emeritus professor of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Gerhke joined MU in 1949 and progressed to the rank of full professor. His interest in analytical chemistry and mass spectrometry was one of the factors in naming the Center for Dr. Gehrke; benefactors are Lowell and Marian Miller.

The Proteomics Center (PC) provides advanced technologies in protein separation and mass spectrometry identification for researchers at the University of Missouri.

The Center accepts any non-hazardous, non-pathogenic, and non-radioactive samples for analyses. These samples can be whole organism (cell pellets, seedlings, etc.), tissue (biopsies, roots, leaves, etc.), or purified protein (cell lysate, precipitated protein, IPs, gel bands/spots).

Requirements:
The tour is open to interested students, faculty and staff.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Core (NMR) Open House

Monday, April 13, 2020. 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Chemistry Building, Room 125.

Registration is Free: Registration is not limited.

The NMR Facility is a campus-wide resource hosted by the Department of Chemistry. The NMR Facility was the first core research facility to be established at MU and continues to serve researchers from many disciplines.

The NMR Facility and staff are available for research support to investigators who want to use NMR for structural elucidation of molecules and for the study of chemical and biological reactions. Assistance in the design of experiments and spectral analysis is available upon request.

Requirements:
The tour is open to interested students, faculty and staff.

Metabolomics Center Open House

Monday, April 13, 2020. 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Bond Life Science Center, Room 243.

Registration is Free: Registration is not limited.

Metabolomics is the large-scale profiling of metabolites in complex biological samples such as cells, cultures, tissues, biofluids and microorganisms. It provides a biochemical snapshot of the physiological status of the cells and has been widely used in life science research.  The Metabolomics Center is equipped with the state-of-the-art mass spectrometry, ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography instrumentation. Come and learn our advanced analytical platforms and the services we offer.

Requirements:
The tour is open to interested students, faculty and staff.

Molecular Cytology Core Open House

Tuesday, April 14, 2020. 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Bond Life Science Center, Room 120.

Registration is Free: Registration is not limited.

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.     Confocal, STED & dSTORM super-resolution microscope demonstrations 

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.    Demonstrations of deconvolution software on confocal and widefield fluorescent images

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.    Overview and demonstration of Leica Thunder stereomicroscope system

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.      Tuesday and selected times Wednesday – Hands-on trials for lab groups by appointment

Leica & North Central Instruments will be demonstrating their new Thunder stereomicroscopy system during Life Science Week. This instrument is suitable for imaging macroscopic fluorescent specimens such as plants, Drosophila, zebrafish, mice, or embryos. It combines a standard stereoscope with a sensitive sCMOS camera and software that can perform “instant computational clearing” to give a large field of view for macroscopic specimens with greatly increased details (see images at https://www.leica-microsystems.com/products/thunder-imaging-systems/p/thunder-imager-model-organism-sensitive/). The MCC will be using LSW week to determine if this instrument would be useful to the MU research community. All are welcome to drop by for a demonstration of its capabilities on Wednesday April 15th at 11:00 a.m. Labs that want to image their own fluorescent samples are strongly encouraged to contact the core for an appointment on Tuesday afternoon or Wednesday to get a personal demonstration and hands-on opportunity.

Requirements: The demonstrations are open to interested students, faculty and staff.

Genome Editing 101: Using CRISPR/Cas9

Wednesday, April 15, 2020. 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Bond Life Science Center, Room 572.

Registration is Free: Registration is on a first come, first serve basis with a class size limit of 25.

The University of Missouri Animal Modeling Core (AMC) is pleased to be conducting an interactive “Genome Editing 101: Using CRISPR/Cas9” training workshop. Taught by Dr. Daniel Davis (Assistant Director of the AMC), this workshop features basic information about how CRISPR technology works as well as cutting-edge advances actively being pursued by experts in the CRISPR field. The program will focus on CRISPR principles, strategies for successful project design, available expertise and resources, as well as discussions of the wealth of diverse CRISPR technology applications.

Requirements: The class is open to interested students, faculty and staff. You must bring a laptop since some activities will require computer use by participants.

Cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM)

Thursday, April 16, 2020. 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Bond Life Science Center, Room 572.

Registration is Free: Registration is on a first come, first serve basis with a class size limit of 25.

Cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) is an ever-expanding area of electron microscopy, enabling visualization of specimens in the frozen, hydrated state resulting in superior ultrastructural preservation when compared to traditional electron microscopy sample preparative methods, involving heavy metal staining and dehydration.  In 2017, CryoEM won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for its ability to solve high resolution (2 Angstrom) protein structures, and improvements since have generated even higher resolution structures, as well as information on protein conformational heterogeneity and membrane protein structures.  These cryoEM methods are also being applied to look at “in situ” cellular ultrastructure, by creating windows into the cell.  The first half of this workshop will cover the basics and benefits of cryoEM and the second half will cover how to get your specimens ready for cryoEM, data collection, and image analysis.  University of Missouri will be investing in cryoEM technologies as part of a new Center of Excellence in Electron Microscopy in the NextGen Precision Health Initiative and the contents of this workshop will equip investigators to take full advantage of these cryoEM resources. 

Requirements: The class is open to interested students, faculty and staff.