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Saturday Morning Science

Grab a cup of coffee and join us for Saturday Morning Science

Saturday Morning Science is a series of one-hour long talks on various scientific topics. No science background is required, only enthusiasm for and an interest in science. The talks are free and open to the public. If you want to know a bit more about science or if you are simply curious, come join us on Saturday morning.

 

Saturday, Sept. 15, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

James Birchler (Curators Professor of Biological Sciences)
with Ed Coe and Gerry Neuffer

“Lewis J. Stadler and a history of genetics at MU”

Colorful and charismatic, Stadler was the co-discoverer of X-rays caused genetic alterations (which won a Nobel Prize for the other co-discoverer, Hermann Muller) and was an eminent contributor to mutation studies and other genetic principles during his career here. Stadler recruited Barbara McClintock and Ernie Sears, among others, to Missouri and started the genetics tradition at MU. McClintock crideited her two times at MU, both being recruited by Stadler, as the beginning of her path to the discovery of transposable elements that garnered her the Nobel Prize in 1983. Sears was awarded the Wolf Prize in Agriculture in 1986. Tales of Stadler, McClintock, Sears and other MU geneticists and their discoveries will be spun with historical pictorial support

Saturday, Sept. 22, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

Denis M. McCarthy, Ph.D.
Professor
MU Department of Psychological Sciences

“What happens when you drink alcohol and why should you care”

Alcohol has a unique role in our society. It is widely, and often safely and enjoyably, used. Yet it is also one of the most costly substances, with significant negative effects on society and individual health. People drink alcohol in varying amounts, with variable effects based on their personality, genetic makeup, and situational factors. Come hear about how alcohol affects everyone, how and why it affects people differently, and how research is finding ways to identify when alcohol puts people at risk and how we can reduce that risk.

Saturday, Sept. 29, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

Carl Gerhardt
Professor Emeritus
MU Department of Biological Sciences

“How frogs find their way and citizens won a battle for conservation”

Dr. Gerhardt recently retired from 44 years as a professor in the Division of Biological Sciences and has started a ‘second act’ as a documentary filmmaker. He will present and discuss excerpts from two of his films related to his lifetime interests in amphibian communication and wildlife conservation: How tiny tropical frogs find their way back home in jungle, and how a handful of Columbia’s citizens reversed city hall’s decision to pump treated sewage directly  to the Missouri River and instead through a wetland treatment system to Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area, one of the finest wildlife areas in the country.

Saturday, Oct. 6, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

David Beversdorf
Professor
MU Department of Psychological Sciences

“The role of stress in the development and treatment of autism spectrum disorders”

The frequency with which children and adults are diagnosed with autism or associated conditions is increasing dramatically- could our modern lifestyle have something to do with it? Dr. Beversdorf will discuss the interactions of genetics, environment, and activity in autism and how researchers are trying to develop better means of diagnosing and treating patients on the autism spectrum.

Saturday, Oct. 13, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

Libby Cowgill
Associate Professor
MU Department of Anthropology

“Neandertals as people: Exploring lives of humans in the past”

When we talk about human evolution, it’s all too easy to miss the humanity of the ancient peoples we evolved from, particularly when discussing species that aren’t even quite human. But it’s actually possible to reconstruct a good deal of the day-to-day lives of ancient human groups, such as Neandertals. This talk focuses on seeing the lives of Neandertals as human beings, explores the day-to-day world of Neandertal families, food, and activities, and explains how researchers know what they know.

 

Saturday, Oct. 27, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

Cam Macris
(IUPUI: Indiana U- Purdue U Indianapolis)

“Seconds after impact”

Not only are asteroid impacts responsible for building and shaping the planets in our solar system, they also play an important role in life on Earth. Impacts facilitated life on early earth by bringing water in the form of ice, and destroyed life later in large, violent events like the one that caused the dinosaurs to go extinct.  But what exactly happens during and after a large impact on Earth that causes such destruction? Come to this edition of Saturday Morning Science to discover how scientists use new technology to learn about these events.

 

Saturday, Nov. 3, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

Alan Whittington
Professor and Chair
MU Department of Geological Sciences

“Vulcan’s fury and Pele’s tears: Our complicated relationship with volcanoes”

About 50 volcanoes erupt in a typical year. What controls where volcanoes occur and how dangerous they are? How often do large eruptions happen, and what are their consequences? How well can we predict eruptions? I’ll answer your volcano questions, with lots of photos, videos, and volcanic rock samples.

 

Saturday, Nov. 10, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

Marie Csete
Marie Csete Consulting

“Building Bonds”

The goals of the Building Bonds series are to encourage interactions between basic scientists, clinicians, and entrepreneurs, and to engage students and the public in life sciences at MU. Dr. Csete will discuss her experiences in academic, government, and entrepreneurial science as well as future directions in translational medicine.

 

Saturday, Dec. 1, 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium, Bond Life Sciences Center

Rob Hall
Professor
MU Department of Plant Sciences

“Forensic Entomology – Bugs Don’t Lie”

Entomological investigators interpret the circumstances and timing of criminal acts, especially murder. In many cases, bugs can provide clues and convictions because of their very predictable patterns of geographic distribution, larval development and behavior.

When and Where

Saturday’s at 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium
Bond Life Sciences Center

Free weekend parking is available in University Avenue Parking Structure, Virginia Avenue Parking Structure and the Virginia Avenue Garage Surface Lot. For directions to the Bond Life Sciences Center, visit: bit.ly/LSCParking

map

Additional map and driving directions.

For ADA accommodations, contact Karla Carter at 573-882-7957 or carterka@missouri.edu.

About

Grab a cup of coffee and a bagel and join us for Saturday Morning Science — a series of one-hour science talks.

These are not typical science lectures. Expect to be entertained, to see demonstrations, to learn a lot, and—best of all—to want to come back for more.

Saturday Morning Science is free and open to the public. No science background is required. All ages are welcome.

Breakfast refreshments are served before the talks, so come early. Talks start at 10:30 a.m. Doors open and refreshments are available a half-hour beforehand.

When and Where:

Saturdays at 10:30 a.m.
Monsanto Auditorium
Bond Life Sciences Center

Free weekend parking is available in University Avenue Parking Structure, Virginia Avenue Parking Structure and the Virginia Avenue Garage Surface Lot. For directions to the Bond Life Sciences Center, visit: bit.ly/LSCParking

map

Additional map and driving directions.

For ADA accommodations, contact Mary Shenk, Director, Life Sciences and Society Program: 573-882-0562 or shenkm@missouri.edu.