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Arabidopsis

March 1, 2016

Unmasking the unknown

Unmasking the unknown

Scientists explore genetic similarities between plants and mice University of Missouri PhD Candidate Daniel L. Leuchtman peers through an Arabidopsis plant. Leuchtman has been experimenting with replacing a gene in the plants immune system with a similar gene from mice. | Photograph by Justin L. Stewart/MU Bond Life Sciences Center By Justin L. Stewart |…

Oct. 8, 2015

Understanding spit

Understanding spit

Scientists find how nematodes use key hormones to take over root cells Roger Meissen | Bond Life Sciences Center This Arabidopsis root shows how the beet cyst nematode activates cytokinin signaling in the syncytium 10 days after infection. The root fluoresces green when the TCSn gene associated with cytokinin activation is turned on because it…

Nov. 20, 2014

“Mutant seeds” blossom in the pollen research field

“Mutant seeds” blossom in the pollen research field

A mutant arabidopsis model nearing pollination. Mutant arabidopsis models under lamps in Shuqun Zhang's lab. Three-month-old mutant arabidopsis models are used to study the function of pollen. The thought of pollen dispersed throughout the air might trigger horrific memories of allergies, but the drifting dander is absolutely essential to all life. Science has long linked…

July 1, 2014

Hearing danger: predator vibrations trigger plant chemical defenses

Hearing danger: predator vibrations trigger plant chemical defenses

Experiments show chewing vibrations, but not wind or insect song, cause response As the cabbage butterfly caterpillar takes one crescent-shaped bite at a time from the edge of a leaf, it doesn’t go unnoticed. This tiny Arabidopsis mustard plant hears its predator loud and clear as chewing vibrations reverberate through leaves and stems, and it reacts…

April 24, 2014

Chemical beacons: LSC scientist discovers how plants beckon bacteria to attack

Chemical beacons: LSC scientist discovers how plants beckon bacteria to attack

Scott Peck, Bond LSC scientist and associate professor of biochemistry, studies Arabidopsis and how bacteria perceive it before initiating an infection. Roger Meissen/ Bond LSC Sometimes plants inadvertently roll out the red carpet for bacteria. Researchers at the University of Missouri Bond Life Sciences Center recently discovered how a plant’s own chemicals act as a…